Scientist appeal, 2018, against the use of whole trees for bioenergy

Almost 800 scientists write to the EU Parliament in January 2018, strongly urging that the burning of whole trees for bioenergy (as opposed to burning harvest residues or production wastes) should not be counted as renewable energy.

EASAC2017: Don’t burn whole trees for bioenergy

The EASAC is an advisory board to the EU, organized by the academies of science of all the EU countries. In this report, the EASAC looks at the functions of the forest and the conflicts of interest around it. They go through the research on forest bioenergy and recommend that whole trees not be used for bioenergy, because it has negative climate impacts. A follow-up report from 2019 which looks at new research draws the same conclusion.

FERN2019: EU forests in danger

The European environmental organization FERN reports on the threats against the forest in various countries around Europe, among them Sweden. Read the entire report.

Angelstam2019: From forest protection to green infrastructure.

This very important report examines the protected forest in Sweden, with Örebro county as an example. Angelstam concludes that we have a long way to go to reach the Aichi targets, not just because the protected area is too small, but because the areas are too small and are not connected. The report is published by the County Administration Board of Örebro.

Swedish Environmental Protection Agency2013: National inventory report of greenhouse gas emissions 1990-2011

Every year Sweden compiles data on the Swedish greenhouse gas emissions, submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency states in its National Inventory Report 2013 that the net removal of carbon dioxide had decreased since 1990, especially during the last few years (up to 2011), due to an increased harvest rate and two severe storms in 2005 and 2007 which brought down large quantities of forest. Read more in the report here.

 

Swedish Environmental Protection Agency2016: National inventory report of greenhouse gas emissions 1990-2014

Every year Sweden compiles data on Swedish greenhouse gas emissions, submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. Since 2013, new guidelines in accordance with the UNFCCC are being used. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency states in its National Inventory Report 2016 that the carbon sink has slightly increased due to stagnated harvest rates in recent years. Since the harvest is below the biomass growth, there is an increase in carbon stock in living biomass. However, the Environmental Protection Agency concludes that net removals of carbon dioxide are heavily influenced by disturbances due to harvests and natural disturbances such as storms. Read more in the report here.

 

AirClim2010: Boreal Forest and Climate Change – regional perspectives

Among the land ecosystems of the earth, boreal forest is likely to be especially affected by climate change, because of its sensitivity to warming and the high rates of projected warming in the Arctic region. This report covers some aspects of the interaction between climate change and boreal forest from a regional perspective, dealing separately with Scandinavia, Russia and North America (Canada). Read the report here.

Protect the Forest2009: Climate and boreal forests

Protect the Forest states the facts on how the forest can mitigate climate change, how intensive forest management activities increase the greenhouse gas emissions and how the protection of natural forest ecosystems prevents carbon emissions. Read the report here.

 

Greenpeace2008: Turning up the heat

How the degradation of Canada’s boreal forests has contributed to climate change. Greenpeace has in cooperation with researchers at University of Toronto written this comprehensive report on carbon stocks, resilience, logging and forest protection. Read the report ‘Turning up the heat’ here.

 

Greenpeace2008: Combating climate change through boreal forest conservation

Climate change is already affecting the boreal forest. Increased temperatures causes increased stress and vulnerability to the forests and the species that live there. Intact forest landscapes and natural forests resist and recover better from fires, storms, insect outbreaks and other types of climate impacts, compared to fragmented areas and plantations. These areas give the trees, plants and animals better possibilities to migrate, adapt and survive in a climate that is changing. Read the Greenpeace report, which is written in cooperation with University of Toronto, here.