Frey and co-workers used fine-grained modeling of the effect of old-growth forest on temperature in a warming climate. They find that these forests work as a buffer, reducing the maximum temperatures by as much as 2.5oC. Therefore stopping the loss of old-growth forests and an adaptation of management strategies to maintain old-growth characteristics would work as an insurance against biodiversity loss due to climate change. Read the whole article in Science Advances.

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